Sure, it sounds funny to hear of a coach hiring a business coach, or a virtual assistant hiring her own VA. But these are simple examples of how sometimes experts need to hire their own experts to give them some objective insight into their business or their lives.

You can be a top business coach but still need help growing your business. Sometimes life coaches need help sorting through their own personal messes just like they help their clients. When you’re too close to a situation, it’s difficult to look objectively for solutions. Of course, what works for one person doesn’t always work for the next so hearing some different ideas from an outside source may be the solution you need.

Expand Your Team to Include Your Personal Business Coach

Take some of your own advice to heart: think of hiring a business coach as an investment in your business. I’m sure you’ve told clients that before, right? The same is true here. Think of how you currently run your business and what long term goals you have in mind. A coach can help you prioritize those goals and offer solutions to problems. They can also look at your day to day activities and think of creative ways to streamline some processes.

Never Think of Hiring a Coach as a Sign of Weakness or Failure

Do you fall victim to the false narrative that because you’re a business coach you should know everything there is to know about business? Or that because you have this knowledge, you should have a multi-million dollar coaching business? There’s something to be said about knowing and living what you teach but there are always situations when you need that outside help. 

Here’s another example: If an unscrupulous attorney gets himself into trouble, he hires another lawyer to represent him. Even though the bad lawyer has the knowledge to represent himself, he often won’t, because he needs that objective outside viewpoint.

Virtual assistants are another example. Their main focus is on helping their clients build their business but then the backend of the VA’s business often gets ignored because she’s so busy doing client work. It’s not unheard of for VA #1 to hire VA #2 to handle the daily business tasks so VA #1 can focus on her client’s work.

How to Find a Coach’s Coach

No doubt you know other coaches through your networking efforts, so start with those names when you’re ready to find your own coach. Think about their personalities. Learn more about their coaching styles. Again, think of your own advice you give to prospects: you’ll want a coach who won’t judge you and who will make you feel comfortable confiding your deepest fears and secrets. As you know, coaching only works when you are willing to open up and willing to do the work so you need to find that coach who encourages those things. Don’t forget about the interview process. Don’t just pick your friend because you’ve been following each other over the years; interview other lesser-known coaches in your circle, too, in order to find the perfect fit.

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